What is Greenwashing?

It is used to describe the actions of a company which advertises positive environmental practices while acting in the opposite way. The term is generally used when significantly more money or time has been spent advertising being green, rather than spending resources on environmentally sound practices. Greenwashing was coined by NY environmentalist Jay Westerveldin an essay…

It is used to describe the actions of a company which advertises positive environmental practices while acting in the opposite way. The term is generally used when significantly more money or time has been spent advertising being green, rather than spending resources on environmentally sound practices. Greenwashing was coined by NY environmentalist Jay Westerveldin an essay regarding the hotel industry’s practice of placing green placards in each room, promoting reuse of guest-towels, ostensibly to “save the environment”. Westerveld noted that, in most cases, little or no effort toward waste recycling was being implemented by these institutions.

Green Fatigue

Tired and confused of all green choices you should make? Organic, bio, eco, environment friendly products everywhere? Who can you trust? Green choices not convenient, too bad quality and too expensive? Too much work? Consumer Reports writes about green fatigue: “You know you suffer from green fatigue when you hide the empty jelly jar in the…

Tired and confused of all green choices you should make? Organic, bio, eco, environment friendly products everywhere? Who can you trust? Green choices not convenient, too bad quality and too expensive? Too much work? Consumer Reports writes about green fatigue: “You know you suffer from green fatigue when you hide the empty jelly jar in the trash, rather than rinse and recycle. Consumers now push back, and they are right to question whether green products are better for the environment. Many green products found on store shelves are guilty of green washing, according to TerraChoice, an environmental marketing agency. Moreover a recent report from GFK found that more and more people think green products are too expensive and they don’t work as well as conventional products.”

Compostable Coffee Pods

Halo is a completely bio-degradable coffee capsule compatible with your home Nespresso machine. Designed with an innovative blend of compostable natural fibres to protect the coffee flavours. Like many coffee drinkers across the world Halo was dissatisfied with the coffee capsule industries practices, vagueness and green washing. -13,500 non-biodegradable coffee capsules being thrown into landfill every minute. -39,000 coffee capsules globally…

Halo is a completely bio-degradable coffee capsule compatible with your home Nespresso machine. Designed with an innovative blend of compostable natural fibres to protect the coffee flavours. Like many coffee drinkers across the world Halo was dissatisfied with the coffee capsule industries practices, vagueness and green washing.

-13,500 non-biodegradable coffee capsules being thrown into landfill every minute.

-39,000 coffee capsules globally are produced every minute.

-Between 13,500 and 29,000 of these are sent to landfill.

-That’s over 20 billion capsules containing aluminium or plastic produced every year

-Circling the earth 14 times over

Aluminium and plastic coffee capsules are difficult and time consuming for people to recycle so most of them get thrown in the bin. Or they have to be sent for industrial composting which can be very difficult and expensive. Halo is made of entirely organic materials; Bamboo and paper pulp. “It’s not a cheap way of packaging coffee but it’s the right way.”